“Around you there are many examples of ways to solve your own problems and create compelling opportunities. Learn to look outside.”

David Mansfield 

Revolution Reading

Business books and articles are an excellent source of new ideas and different perspectives. Each selection will be summarised, highlighting the lessons to be learned and an actionable idea that David recommends you apply to your business. A new Revolution Reading will be added every month.

Bad Blood

By John Carreyou

What's it about?

Written by the Pulitzer-winning journalist John Carreyrou, Bad Blood meticulously documents the fascinating rise and fall of the notorious Elizabeth Holmes and her now-defunct tech start-up, Theranos. The company claimed it had created a device which would revolutionise blood testing in a cheap and efficient way. They were backed by big investors and the company was at one point valued at nearly $10 billion and employed over 800 people. Carreyrou spent three years unpicking the web of deceit spun by Holmes, interviewing ex-employees to get the inside scoop, which culminated in Carreyrou’s expose published in The Wall Street Journal in 2015. This ultimately led to the collapse of Theranos, and Holmes is now awaiting trial on fraud charges.

What's in it for me?

Bad Blood will show you the pitfalls of confirmation bias in business and just how powerful it can be – when you really want to believe something, you will.

What can I learn?

  1. The importance of due-diligence processes and trying the product before committing to an investment
  2. Ask challenging questions and maintain a healthy scepticism of untested technology and products
  3. A diverse board of suitable advisors with relevant experience can be key to success and highlight any red flags or improvements needed
  4. The importance of evidence-based decision making
  5. Not to prioritise your own ego and personal legacy above everybody else

Start on Monday:

Be more inquisitive and ask for reputable data when considering the purchase of a new product or service. No question is stupid and don’t be afraid to appear naïve. Is there someone in your team who has more expertise than you on the subject? Include them in your market research and due diligence processes. If you don’t, seek out someone who does before committing to an investment.


What they don’t teach you at Harvard Business School, by By Mark H McCormack

What's in it for me?

This book is suited to middle management roles and entrepreneurs looking to gain some practical advice on topics such as sales, negotiation, running a business, reading others and time management.

PDF summary

Talking to Strangers, by Malcolm Gladwell

What's in it for me?

Iwill help you to explore your own behaviour in dealing with strangers and guide you in building stronger relationships 

PDF summary

Shoe Dog, by Phil Knight

What's in it for me?

This is not your typical checklist and tips business book. It is an honest account of the often tumultuous road to success, which will energise and inspire the most determined entrepreneurs.

PDF summary

Atomic Habits, by James Clear

What's in it for me?

You will find out how habits are formed, how to make them stick and how embracing habits is a great way to take control of your life and achieve more.

PDF summary

Only the Paranoid Survive, by Andrew S. Grove

What's in it for me?

Learn how one of the most successful companies in the world survived moments of crisis. Gove gives advice on how to identify ‘strategic inflection points’ and lead teams through them.

PDF summary